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KJV

Strongs Concordance

Websters dictionary 1828

 

Proverbs 1:6

fool

Webster Definition

Fool
FOOL, n. [Heb.]

1. One who is destitute of reason, or the common powers of understanding; an idiot. Some persons are born fools, and are called natural fools; others may become fools by some injury done to the brain.

2. In common language, a person who is somewhat deficient in intellect, but not an idiot; or a person who acts absurdly; one who does not exercise his reason; one who pursues a course contrary to the dictates of wisdom.

Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other.

3. In scripture, fool is often used for a wicked or depraved person; one who acts contrary to sound wisdom in his moral deportment; one who follows his own inclinations, who prefers trifling and temporary pleasures to the service of God and eternal happiness.

The fool hath said in his heart, there is no God. Psa 14.

4. A weak christian; a godly person who has much remaining sin and unbelief.

O fools, and slow of heart to believe all the prophets have written. Luke 24.

Also, one who is accounted or called a food by ungodly men. 1 Cor 4:10.

5. A term of indignity and reproach.

To be thought knowing, you must first put the fool upon all mankind.

6. One who counterfeits folly; a buffoon; as a king's fool.

I scorn, although their drudge, to be their fool or jester.

1. To play the fool, to act the buffoon; to jest; to make sport.

2. To act like one void of understanding.

To put the fool on, to impose on; to delude.

To make a fool of, to frustrate; to defeat; to disappoint.

FOOL, v.i. To trifle; to toy; to spend time in idleness, sport or mirth.

Is this a time for fooling?

FOOL, v.t.

1. To treat with contempt; to disappoint; to defeat; to frustrate; to deceive; to impose on.

When I consider life, 'tis all a cheat; for fooled with hope, men favor the deceit.

2. To infatuate; to make foolish.

3. To cheat; as, to fool one out of his money.

1. To fool away, to spend in trifles, idleness, folly, or without advantage; as, to fool away time.

2. To spend for things of no value or use; to expend improvidently; as, to fool away money.

 

Strong's Concordance

H3684
כּסיל
kesı̂yl
kes-eel'
From H3688; properly fat, that is, (figuratively) stupid or silly: -

H3688
כּסל
kâsal
kaw-sal'
A primitive root; properly to be fat, that is, (figuratively) silly: -